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India Surges to Second Place as Top Source of New US Citizens

India Surges to Second Place as Top Source of New US Citizens

The Congressional Research Service's latest "US Naturalisation Policy" report for the fiscal year 2022 revealed that a total of 969,380 individuals were naturalised as US citizens. Among these, individuals born in Mexico accounted for the highest number of naturalisations, followed by those from India, the Philippines, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic.

Specifically, the report outlined that in 2022, 128,878 Mexican nationals, 65,960 Indians, 53,413 Filipinos, 46,913 Cubans, 34,525 Dominicans, 33,246 Vietnamese, and 27,038 Chinese individuals became American citizens based on available data.

Looking at broader trends, as of 2023, the CRS highlighted that there were 2,831,330 foreign-born American nationals from India, making it the second-largest group after Mexico, which had 10,638,429 foreign-born American nationals. China followed closely with 2,225,447 foreign-born American nationals.

However, a significant aspect noted in the report is that 42% of India-born foreign nationals residing in the US are currently ineligible to pursue US citizenship. This finding underscores the complexities and challenges faced by certain immigrant communities in accessing naturalisation opportunities despite their substantial presence in the country.

The data presented in the CRS report sheds light on the diverse demographic composition of naturalised US citizens and the hurdles that some immigrant groups encounter in their path to citizenship. It reflects the ongoing dialogue and policy considerations surrounding immigration and naturalisation policies in the United States.

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India Surges to Second Place as Top Source of New US Citizens

India Surges to Second Place as Top Source of New US Citizens

The Congressional Research Service's latest "US Naturalisation Policy" report for the fiscal year 2022 revealed that a total of 969,380 individuals were naturalised as US citizens. Among these, individuals born in Mexico accounted for the highest number of naturalisations, followed by those from India, the Philippines, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic.

Specifically, the report outlined that in 2022, 128,878 Mexican nationals, 65,960 Indians, 53,413 Filipinos, 46,913 Cubans, 34,525 Dominicans, 33,246 Vietnamese, and 27,038 Chinese individuals became American citizens based on available data.

Looking at broader trends, as of 2023, the CRS highlighted that there were 2,831,330 foreign-born American nationals from India, making it the second-largest group after Mexico, which had 10,638,429 foreign-born American nationals. China followed closely with 2,225,447 foreign-born American nationals.

However, a significant aspect noted in the report is that 42% of India-born foreign nationals residing in the US are currently ineligible to pursue US citizenship. This finding underscores the complexities and challenges faced by certain immigrant communities in accessing naturalisation opportunities despite their substantial presence in the country.

The data presented in the CRS report sheds light on the diverse demographic composition of naturalised US citizens and the hurdles that some immigrant groups encounter in their path to citizenship. It reflects the ongoing dialogue and policy considerations surrounding immigration and naturalisation policies in the United States.

 
 
 
 
 

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