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Worlds Records Hottest Decade Ever

Worlds Records Hottest Decade Ever

The United Nations' World Meteorological Organization (WMO) confirmed that 2023 was the hottest year on record, marking the culmination of the hottest decade ever recorded. This revelation underscores the urgent climate crisis facing the planet. The average near-surface temperature in 2023 was 1.45 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, dangerously close to the critical 1.5-degree threshold set in the 2015 Paris climate accords.

The WMO's State of the Climate report issued a "red alert" to the world, emphasizing that climate change goes beyond rising temperatures. Record-breaking events such as unprecedented ocean warmth, glacier retreat, and Antarctic sea ice loss are causes for significant concern. Marine heatwaves affected nearly a third of the global ocean daily, with over 90 percent experiencing heatwave conditions at some point in the year, posing threats to marine ecosystems and coral reefs.

The report highlighted alarming trends like the largest glacier ice loss since 1950, especially in western North America and Europe. Alpine glaciers in Switzerland lost 10 percent of their remaining volume in just two years. Antarctic sea ice extent hit a record low, and sea levels rose to their highest since satellite records began in 1993, with a sea level rise rate doubling over the past decade.

These climate shifts are exacerbating extreme weather events, flooding, droughts, and food insecurity, impacting millions globally. The number of acutely food-insecure people doubled from 149 million before the pandemic to 333 million by the end of 2023. However, there is a glimmer of hope in the surge of renewable energy generation, which increased by nearly 50 percent in 2023.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres emphasized that despite the dire situation, humanity still has a chance to limit long-term temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius and mitigate the worst effects of climate change. The report serves as a stark reminder of the urgent need for global action to address the climate crisis and protect the planet's future.

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Worlds Records Hottest Decade Ever

Worlds Records Hottest Decade Ever
The United Nations' World Meteorological Organization (WMO) confirmed that 2023 was the hottest year on record, marking the culmination of the hottest decade ever recorded. This revelation underscores the urgent climate crisis facing the planet. The average near-surface temperature in 2023 was 1.45 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, dangerously close to the critical 1.5-degree threshold set in the 2015 Paris climate accords.

The WMO's State of the Climate report issued a "red alert" to the world, emphasizing that climate change goes beyond rising temperatures. Record-breaking events such as unprecedented ocean warmth, glacier retreat, and Antarctic sea ice loss are causes for significant concern. Marine heatwaves affected nearly a third of the global ocean daily, with over 90 percent experiencing heatwave conditions at some point in the year, posing threats to marine ecosystems and coral reefs.

The report highlighted alarming trends like the largest glacier ice loss since 1950, especially in western North America and Europe. Alpine glaciers in Switzerland lost 10 percent of their remaining volume in just two years. Antarctic sea ice extent hit a record low, and sea levels rose to their highest since satellite records began in 1993, with a sea level rise rate doubling over the past decade.

These climate shifts are exacerbating extreme weather events, flooding, droughts, and food insecurity, impacting millions globally. The number of acutely food-insecure people doubled from 149 million before the pandemic to 333 million by the end of 2023. However, there is a glimmer of hope in the surge of renewable energy generation, which increased by nearly 50 percent in 2023.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres emphasized that despite the dire situation, humanity still has a chance to limit long-term temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius and mitigate the worst effects of climate change. The report serves as a stark reminder of the urgent need for global action to address the climate crisis and protect the planet's future.

 
 
 
 
 

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