Delhi: AQI levels remain high

by October 2, 2018 0 comments

Delhi Air PollutionAir pollution has always been a major issue in Delhi, and with the way things are going, it is only getting worse.

It was sheer good luck that the national capital through most of September registered satisfactory It was sheer good luck that the national capital through most of September registered satisfactory Air Quality Index (AQI) levels with data from the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) showing AQI at around 30 on certain days at a few monitoring stations; overall, the city recorded an AQI of between below-50 to 150, which is good. Credit for this improvement goes to the munificence of nature, though, with the rains thanks to the delayed withdrawal of the monsoon washing away pollutants. Come October, and normal service has resumed, as it were. According to the CPCB, air quality levels have worsened four times and are now in the 159-200 range.  Ever increasing levels of nitrous oxides and soot particles, registered from emissions from vehicles, the beginning of crop stubble burning in neighbouring States, construction and industrial activity in the Capital — all the usual suspects — are back in play.

The one issue that last week’s AQI data has highlighted is of vehicular pollution. Data from the Delhi Government transport department shows that the number of vehicles in the city crossed the one crore mark in 2017 and two-wheelers have been the major contributors to air pollution. Lakhs of vehicles do not even have pollution certificates. The powers-that-be have not helped matters by dragging their feet on implementing measures aimed at checking polluting vehicles. Take, for example, the Supreme Court directions in August last year to ensure classification of vehicles to make it easier to take action when required —  blue stickers for CNG and petrol vehicles and orange stickers for diesel cars — which were to have been mandatory by October 2018 to hasten the process of identifying and acting against polluting vehicles. The deadline has been crossed and everybody is clueless. The construction industry, on the other hand, has been rampantly flouting the Construction and Demolition Waste Rules, 2016 as a visit to any construction site in the Capital will confirm. And it remains to be seen how effective action if any against crop stubble burning in Haryana and Punjab will be over the next few months. With the cooler months approaching, our depressing prognosis is that the Capital’s residents should brace for another gas chamber-like situation. (AQI) levels with data from the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) showing AQI at around 30 on certain days at a few monitoring stations; overall, the city recorded an AQI of between below-50 to 150, which is good. Credit for this improvement goes to the munificence of nature, though, with the rains thanks to the delayed withdrawal of the monsoon washing away pollutants. Come October, and normal service has resumed, as it were. According to the CPCB, air quality levels have worsened four times and are now in the 159-200 range.  Ever increasing levels of nitrous oxides and soot particles, registered from emissions from vehicles, the beginning of crop stubble burning in neighbouring States, construction and industrial activity in the Capital — all the usual suspects — are back in play.

The one issue that last week’s AQI data has highlighted is of vehicular pollution. Data from the Delhi Government transport department shows that the number of vehicles in the city crossed the one crore mark in 2017 and two-wheelers have been the major contributors to air pollution. Lakhs of vehicles do not even have pollution certificates. The powers-that-be have not helped matters by dragging their feet on implementing measures aimed at checking polluting vehicles. Take, for example, the Supreme Court directions in August last year to ensure classification of vehicles to make it easier to take action when required —  blue stickers for CNG and petrol vehicles and orange stickers for diesel cars — which were to have been mandatory by October 2018 to hasten the process of identifying and acting against polluting vehicles. The deadline has been crossed and everybody is clueless. The construction industry, on the other hand, has been rampantly flouting the Construction and Demolition Waste Rules, 2016 as a visit to any construction site in the Capital will confirm. And it remains to be seen how effective action if any against crop stubble burning in Haryana and Punjab will be over the next few months. With the cooler months approaching, our depressing prognosis is that the Capital’s residents should brace for another gas chamber-like situation.

Writer: The Pioneer

Courtesy: The Pioneer

No Comments so far

Jump into a conversation

No Comments Yet!

You can be the one to start a conversation.

Your data will be safe!Your e-mail address will not be published. Also other data will not be shared with third person.