More gift packages on way to US, Warns North Korea

More gift packages on way to US, Warns North Korea

More gift packages on way to US, Warns North Korea

by September 1, 2017 0 comments

Despite worldwide criticism for its nuclear misadventure, the rogue nation is repenting

A mid international uproar over North Korea’s latest and biggest nuclear weapons test, one of its top diplomats said on Tuesday it was ready to send “more gift packages” to the United States.

Han Tae Song, ambassador of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) to the U.N. in Geneva, was addressing the U.N. sponsored Conference on Disarmament two days after his country detonated its sixth nuclear test explosion.

“I am proud of saying that just two days ago on the 3rd of September, DPRK successfully carried out a hydro- gen bomb test for intercontinental ballistic rocket under its plan for building a strategic nuclear force,” Han told the Geneva forum. “The recent self defense measures by my country, DPRK, are a ‘gift package’ addressed to none other than the U.S.,” Han said.

“The U.S. will receive more ‘gift packages’ from my country as long as its relies on reckless provocations and futile attempts to put pressure on the DPRK,” he added without elaborating.

Military measures being taken by North Korea were “an exercise of restraint and justified self-defense right” to counter “the ever-growing and decade long U.S. nuclear threat and hos- tile policy aimed at isolating my country”. “Pressure or sanctions will never work on my country,” Han declared, adding: “The DPRK will never under any circumstances put its nuclear deterrence on the negotiating table.”

Army

North Korea has one of the world’s largest standing armies, with at least 1,000,000 soldiers. However, although the secretive state does not release full details about its armed forces to the rest of the world, their weapons and equipment are believed to be largely obsolete when compared to major Western nations.

tanks

The nation’s 3,500 odd tanks out number its archival South Korea’s fleet by over 1000.

Despite having a larger fleet, most of the North Korean tanks date back to the Soviet era. On the other hand, a major chunk of South Korea’s 2,414 tanks are supplied by the U.S., fitted with modern weaponry, and much more efficient.

Artillery pieces

In terms of artillery, the North Korean army is in possession of over 21,000 pieces of equipment. It is believed that out of the total artillery equipment, many are targeted at Seoul, the South Korean capital city.

Submarines

North Korea boasts of a fleet of at least 72 submarines the highest in the world. The nation’s nuclear weapons could become immune from destruction in case of an preemptive attack, if hidden on board these submarines. In fact, North Korea is reportedly learning the technique of launching nuclear warheads from submarines which, if becomes successful, would allow the country to strike any nation easily.

South Korean marine corps search a North Korean combat class submarine after its discovery on the north-east coast of South Korea, some .62 mile (1 km) south of the demilitarized zone on Sept. 18, 1998.

Frigates

The nation has three frigates (several types of warship) as part of its military possessions. Conversely, the smaller sized South Korean army boasts of 14 frigates currently. Digital satellite imagery of a Soho-class missile frigate at Singyori patrol base in North Korea.

Combat aircraft

The Korean People’s Air Force has a fleet of 563 combat capable aircraft. However, in 2014, each of those planes were grounded for a short period due to low maintenance and poor service.

Aggressive military posturing

North Korea have always maintained an aggressive military posturing against countries it considers “unfriendly,” especially next-door neighbor South Korea. Most recently, tension escalated between the two countries in August 2015 when a North Korean landmine injured two South Korean soldiers. It resulted in the two countries engaging in artillery firing along the demilitarized zone, and North Korea beefing up its front-line troop strength overnight. The standoff eased after the two countries reached an agreement following discussions, and North Korea expressed regret over the landmine incident.

Military guard posts of South Korea (bottom) and North Korea (top) stand opposite each other as seen from the border city of Paju, South Korea, on Aug. 21, 2015.

Human testing for weapons

In June 2015, a North Korean scientist defected to Finland. He carried with him 15 gigabytes of information that showcased how the country’s regime used humans to test its biological and chemical weapons.

Biological weapons

Around the same time, the country released photos showing Kim Jongun touring a pesticide factory, called Pyongyang Bio-technical Institute. However, many experts believe that it could be a facility producing massive amounts of anthrax to be used in weapons.

Chemical weapons

According to Nuclear Threat Initiative, North Korea is believed to be the third largest possessor of chemical weapons.

Cyber army

Finally, North Korea’s cyber military abilities are yet to be fully discovered. It’s worth noting that the nation’s cyber-army has been blamed by the U.S. for the massive Sony hack that occurred in December 2014. U.S. disarmament ambassador Robert Wood said that North Korea had defied the international community once again with its test.

“We look forward to working with our partners in the (Security) Council with regard to a new resolution that will put some of the strongest sanctions possible on the DPRK,” he told the conference. “Advances in the regime’s nuclear and missile programme are a threat to us all … now is the time to say tests, threats and destabilizing actions will no longer be tolerated,” Wood said. It can no longer be business as usual with this regime.” The White House said on Monday President Donald Trump had agreed “in principle” to scrap a warhead weight limit on South Korea’s missiles in the wake of the North’s latest test. The United States accused North Korea’s trading partners of aiding its nuclear ambitions and said Pyongyang was “begging for war”.

– Courtesy Reuters

 

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